Does routine assessment and real-time feedback improve cancer patients’ psychosocial well-being?

Authors

  • A. BOYES mph ,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology (CHeRP), Hunter Medical Research Institute, The University of Newcastle & The Cancer Council NSW, Wallsend,
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  • S. NEWELL phd ,

    1. Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology (CHeRP), Hunter Medical Research Institute, The University of Newcastle & The Cancer Council NSW, Wallsend, and Health Promotion Unit, Northern Rivers Area Health Service, Lismore,
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  • A. GIRGIS phd ,

    1. Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology (CHeRP), Hunter Medical Research Institute, The University of Newcastle & The Cancer Council NSW, Wallsend, Australia,
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  • P. McELDUFF phd ,

    1. Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK,
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  • R. SANSON-FISHER phd

    1. Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
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Allison Boyes, Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology, Locked Bag 10, Wallsend, NSW, 2287, Australia (e-mail: Allison.Boyes@newcastle.edu.au).

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of giving medical oncologists immediate feedback about cancer patients’ self-reported psychosocial well-being in reducing those patients’ levels of anxiety, depression, perceived needs and physical symptoms. Cancer patients attending one cancer centre for their first visit were allocated to intervention (n = 42) or control (n = 38) groups. All patients completed a computerized survey assessing their psychosocial well-being while waiting to see the oncologist. Intervention patients’ responses were immediately scored and summary reports were placed in each patient's file for follow-up. A total of 48 participants (25 intervention and 23 control) completed the survey four times. Intervention patients who reported a debilitating physical symptom at visit 2 were significantly less likely to report a debilitating physical symptom at visit 3 compared with control patients (OR = 2.8, P = 0.04). Reductions in levels of anxiety, depression and perceived needs among intervention patients were not significantly different to control patients. Repeated collection and immediate feedback of patient-reported health information to oncologists has potential to improve patients’ symptom control, but has little impact upon emotional well-being, including those at high risk. Future research should consider providing the feedback to other health professionals and patients, and monitor the impact on the process of individual patient care.

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