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A review of prostate-specific antigen screening prevalence and risk perceptions for first-degree relatives of men with prostate cancer

Authors

  • M.E. MCDOWELL bpsych (hons),

    1. School of Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane
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  • S. OCCHIPINTI phd ,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane
      Stefano Occhipinti, School of Psychology, Griffith University, Nathan QLD 4111, Australia (e-mail: S.Occhipinti@griffith.edu.au).
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  • R.A. GARDINER mbbs, md, fracs, frcs, professor,

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Queensland; Consultant Urologist, Department of Urology, Royal Brisbane Hospital; Australian Prostate Cancer Collaboration, Brisbane
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  • P.D. BAADE senior research fellow, adjunct associate professor,

    1. Viertel Centre for Research in Cancer Control, The Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane and
    2. School of Public Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane
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  • S.K. STEGINGA phd

    1. General Manager Programs and Research, Viertel Centre for Research in Cancer Control, The Cancer Council Queensland; School of Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia
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Stefano Occhipinti, School of Psychology, Griffith University, Nathan QLD 4111, Australia (e-mail: S.Occhipinti@griffith.edu.au).

Abstract

MCDOWELL M.E., OCCHIPINTI S., GARDINER R.A., BAADE P.D. & STEGINGA S.K. (2009) European Journal of Cancer Care
A review of prostate-specific antigen screening prevalence and risk perceptions for first-degree relatives of men with prostate cancer

First-degree relatives of men with prostate cancer have a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer than men without a family history. The present review examines the prevalence and predictors of testing in first-degree relatives, perceptions of risk, prostate cancer knowledge and psychological consequences of screening. Medline, PsycInfo and Cinahl databases were searched for articles examining risk perceptions or screening practices of first-degree relatives of men with prostate cancer for the period of 1990 to August 2007. Eighteen studies were eligible for inclusion. First-degree relatives participated in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing more and perceived their risk of prostate cancer to be higher than men without a family history. Family history factors (e.g. being an unaffected son rather than an unaffected brother) were consistent predictors of PSA testing. Studies were characterized by sampling biases and a lack of longitudinal assessments. Prospective, longitudinal assessments with well-validated and comprehensive measures are needed to identify factors that cue the uptake of screening and from this develop an evidence base for decision support. Men with a family history may benefit from targeted communication about the risks and benefits of prostate cancer testing that responds to the implications of their heightened risk.

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