Sleep and daily functioning during androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

Authors

  • L.J. HANISCH PSYD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • N.S. GOONERATNE MD, MSC,

    1. Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, and Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, Division of Sleep Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
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  • K. SOIN BA,

    1. Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
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  • P.R. GEHRMAN PHD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • D.J. VAUGHN MD,

    1. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
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  • J.C. COYNE PHD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Laura J. Hanisch, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market Street, Room 671, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA (e-mail: hanisch@mail.med.upenn.edu).

Abstract

HANISCH L.J., GOONERATNE N.S., SOIN K., GEHRMAN P.R., VAUGHN D.J. & COYNE J.C. (2010) European Journal of Cancer Care
Sleep and daily functioning during androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

A limited body of evidence suggests that sleep problems are common in prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy, yet little is known about sleep characteristics and the effects of poor sleep on daily functioning in this population. This study assessed sleep in 60 prostate cancer patients taking androgen deprivation therapy with wrist actigraphy and daily diaries for 7 days. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the general version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale were also administered. On average, total sleep time was 5.9 (SD = 1.4) h, and sleep efficiency was 75% (SD = 12.0) as assessed by actigraphy. There was generally poor concordance between actigraphy and daily diary for most sleep metrics. Subjects reported awakening, on average, 2.7 times per night, most commonly for nocturia and hot flashes. Assessment of daily functioning showed that participants had mild daytime sleepiness, which was predicted by total sleep time (F(1,47) = 4.5, P= 0.04) General quality of life was not impaired. This study supports more research on the predictors of poor sleep in order to identify effective interventions.

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