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Information needs across the colorectal cancer care continuum: scoping the literature

Authors


  • Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Catherine van Mossel, University of Victoria, 1223 Oxford Street, Victoria, BC, Canada V8V 2V6 (e-mail: cvanmossel@islandnet.com).

Abstract

VAN MOSSEL C., LEITZ L., SCOTT S., DAUDT H., DENNIS D., WATSON H., ALFORD M., MITCHELL A., PAYEUR N., COSBY C., LEVI-MILNE R. & PURKIS M.E. (2012) European Journal of Cancer Care21, 296–320

Information needs across the colorectal cancer care continuum: scoping the literature

Because cancer care requires a multifaceted approach, providing useful and timely information to people with colorectal cancer may be fragmented and inconsistent. Our interest was in examining what has and has not captured the attention of researchers speaking to the information needs of people with colorectal cancer. We followed Arksey and O'Malley's framework for the methodology of scoping review. Focusing solely on colorectal cancer, we analysed 239 articles to get a picture of which information needs and sources of information, as well as the timing of providing information, were attended to. Treatment-related information received the most mentions (26%). Healthcare professionals (49%) were mentioned as the most likely source of information. Among articles focused on one stage of the care continuum, post-treatment (survivorship) received the most attention (16%). Only 27% of the articles consulted people with colorectal cancer and few attended to diet/nutrition and bowel management. This study examined the numerical representation of issues to which researchers attend, not the quality of the mentions. We ponder, however, on the relationship between the in/frequency of mentions and the actual information needs of people with colorectal cancer as well as the availability, sources and timing of information.

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