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Oesophageal sensation in response to high PCO2 and acidic solutions in nonerosive reflux disease

Authors

  • Tiberiu Hershcovici,

    1. The Neuroenteric Clinical Research Group, Section of Gastroenterology, Southern Arizona VA Health Care System and University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
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  • Choo H. Poh,

    1. The Neuroenteric Clinical Research Group, Section of Gastroenterology, Southern Arizona VA Health Care System and University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
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  • Ofer Z. Fass,

    1. The Neuroenteric Clinical Research Group, Section of Gastroenterology, Southern Arizona VA Health Care System and University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
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  • Nicole Ashpole,

    1. The Neuroenteric Clinical Research Group, Section of Gastroenterology, Southern Arizona VA Health Care System and University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
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  • Yasutada Akiba,

    1. Greater Los Angles Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, and Brentwood Biomedical Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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  • Jose M. Guillén-Rodríguez,

    1. University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
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  • Jonathan D. Kaunitz,

    1. Greater Los Angles Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, and Brentwood Biomedical Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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  • Ronnie Fass

    1. The Neuroenteric Clinical Research Group, Section of Gastroenterology, Southern Arizona VA Health Care System and University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ, USA
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Ronnie Fass, MD, Professor of Medicine, University of Arizona, Head, Neuroenteric Clinical Research Group, Chief of Gastroenterology, Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, 601 S. 6th Avenue (1-111-GI), Tucson, AZ 85723-0001 USA. Tel.: 520.792.1450, ext. 5139; fax: 520.629.4737; e-mail: ronnie.fass@va.gov

Abstract

Eur J Clin Invest 2011

Abstract

Background  Heartburn is commonly associated with the presence of acid in the oesophageal lumen. However, in patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), the mechanism by which acid traverses the mucosa is not clear. We hypothesized that the luminal acid signal traverses the oesophageal epithelium in the form of the highly permeant gas CO2, which then is reconverted to H+ in the submucosa.

Materials and methods  Ten patients with heartburn, normal upper endoscopy and increased oesophageal acid exposure (NERD patients) and 10 healthy subjects were enrolled. Perceptual responses to intraoesophageal acid (0·1 N HCl solution) and a high PCO2 solution were determined using a randomized cross over design. Stimulus–response functions to perfusions were quantified by three parameters: lag time to symptom perception, intensity rating and perfusion sensitivity score.

Results  In NERD patients, the difference in lag time to typical symptom perception, intensity rating and perfusion sensitivity score between high PCO2 and acid perfusions was statistically significant (P = 0·02, 0·01 and 0·02, respectively). However, the difference in the same perfusion parameters between acid and high PCO2 perfusions was nonsignificant in healthy controls. When NERD and controls were compared, the difference between the different perfusion variables was nonsignificant (adjusted to age).

Conclusions  In NERD subjects, acid perfusion reliably evoked heartburn symptoms of greater intensity than in healthy controls. Nevertheless, a high PCO2 perfusion failed to produce symptoms in either group.

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