Interactive effects of chlorimuron-ethyl and copper(II) on their sorption and desorption on two typical Chinese soils

Authors

  • Wenjie Ren,

    1. Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China
    2. Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
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  • Qixing Zhou,

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China
    2. Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria (Ministry of Education), College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China
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  • Meie Wang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China
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  • R. N. Jadeja

    1. Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara 390002, India
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Q. X. Zhou. E-mail: Zhouqx523@yahoo.com

Abstract

Concern about combined pollution of agricultural ecosystems by chlorimuron-ethyl (CHL) and copper (Cu) has increased of late, particularly in northeastern China. Sorption and desorption of CHL and Cu on soils and their interactive effects strongly affect their mobility and bioavailability. Thus, the interaction between CHL and Cu(II) with regard to their sorption and desorption on brown earth (BE, luvisols) and black soils (BS, phaeozem), two typical soils in northeastern China, was investigated by using batch experiments. The results indicated that the presence of Cu(II) increased the sorption of CHL on the two soils, which can be attributed to decreased pH in the equilibrium solution and Cu-bridging. The formation of a Cu-CHL complex with stronger affinity to the soils than CHL itself may be another mechanism. Addition of Cu(II) also enhanced the hysteresis effect of CHL desorption from BS but decreased that from BE. CHL at small concentrations promoted Cu(II) slightly sorption on BE and BS by the bridging effect of CHL. In addition, CHL suppressed Cu(II) desorption from the two soils, decreasing the mobility and bioavailability of Cu(II).

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