Habitat carrying capacity is reached for the European eel in a small coastal catchment: evidence and implications for managing eel stocks

Authors


Anthony Acou, UMR 7208 “Biologie des Organismes et Ecosystèmes Aquatiques”, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Station Marine de Dinard, BP 70134, 38 rue du Port Blanc, 35800 Dinard, France. E-mail: acou@mnhn.fr

Summary

1. Despite carrying capacity being one of the most important parameters in population management and modelling, we lack substantial evidence for habitat limitations on freshwater species. Here we tested the ideal free distribution (IFD) hypothesis using an indirect behaviour-based method for small closed populations assuming that animals can effectively estimate habitat suitability and distribute themselves accordingly in time and space.

2. We analysed spatiotemporal variations in the density of the European eel Anguilla, a catadromous species with good colonisation abilities in a small coastal catchment in France. The general linear model used enabled us to test simultaneously the effect of temporal, macro- and meso-scale habitat factors on the presence and abundance of eels at 30 sites over an 8-year period.

3. Almost every site sampled had eels, whatever its location on the catchment and its habitat characteristics. Density estimates (overall mean ± SD of 0.40 ± 0.48 m−2) were at the upper range of other values for European catchments. Moreover, eel densities were mainly influenced by the availability of suitable habitats (rocky substratum and instream cover), which suggests that their distribution reflects an IFD.

4. Despite marked variability in recruitment, the density of the oldest size-class remained stable over the study, suggesting that density-dependent mortality occurred, probably due to intraspecific competition for space and food and to predation.

5. These findings suggest that eel habitats are saturated in the Frémur. Therefore, we suggest that the mean abundance of eels observed could serve as a threshold value for other male-dominated river stocks (provided they have a similar overall percentage of suitable habitats) that are common in small, low gradient streams on the north-Atlantic coast of Europe.

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