Scaling of insect metabolic rate is inconsistent with the nutrient supply network model

Authors

  • S. L. CHOWN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa;
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  • E. MARAIS,

    1. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa;
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  • J. S. TERBLANCHE,

    1. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa;
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  • C. J. KLOK,

    1. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa;
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    • **

      Present address: School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Box 874501, Tempe, AZ 885287-4501, USA

  • J. R. B. LIGHTON,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA;
    2. Sable Systems International, 7231 S Eastern Avenue B199, Las Vegas, NV 89119, USA; and
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  • T. M. BLACKBURN

    1. School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
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†Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: slchown@sun.ac.za

Summary

  • 1The nutrient supply network model of the metabolic theory of ecology predicts that metabolic rate scales as mass0·75 at all hierarchical levels.
  • 2An alternative, cell size, model suggests that the scaling of metabolic rate is a by-product of the way in which body size changes, by cell size or number, or some combination thereof. It predicts a scaling exponent of mass0·75 at the widest interspecific level, but values of mass0·67−1·0 for lower taxonomic groups or within species.
  • 3Here these predictions are tested in insects using 391 species for the interspecific analysis, and the size-polymorphic workers of eight ant species at the intraspecific level. In the latter, the contribution of ommatidium size and number to variation in body length, which is closely related to eye size, is used to assess the relative contributions of changes in cell size and number to variation in body size.
  • 4Before controlling for phylogeny, metabolic rate scaled interspecifically as mass0·82. Following phylogenetic correction, metabolic rate scaled as mass0·75.
  • 5By contrast, the intraspecific scaling exponents varied from 0·67 to 1·0. Moreover, in the species where metabolic rate scaled as mass1·0, cell size did not contribute significantly to models of body size variation, only cell number was significant. Where the scaling exponent was < 1·0, cell size played an increasingly important role in accounting for size variation.
  • 6Data for one of the largest groups of organisms on earth are therefore inconsistent with the nutrient supply network model, but provide support for the cell size alternative.

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