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Keywords:

  • Surface waves and free oscillations;
  • Seismic anisotropy;
  • Wave Scattering and diffraction

SUMMARY

The deployment of temporary arrays of broadband seismological stations over dedicated targets is common practice. Measurement of surface wave phase velocity across a small array and its depth-inversion gives us information about the structure below the array which is complementary to the information obtained from body-wave analysis. The question is however: what do we actually measure when the array is much smaller than the wave length, and how does the measured phase velocity relates to the real structure below the array? We quantify this relationship by performing a series of numerical simulations of surface wave propagation in 3-D structures and by measuring the apparent phase velocity across the array on the synthetics. A principal conclusion is that heterogeneities located outside the array can map in a complex way onto the phase velocities measured by the array. In order to minimize this effect, it is necessary to have a large number of events and to average measurements from events well-distributed in backazimuth. A second observation is that the period of the wave has a remarkably small influence on the lateral resolution of the measurement, which is dominantly controlled by the size of the array. We analyse if the artefacts created by heterogeneities can be mistaken for azimuthal variations caused by anisotropy. We also show that if the amplitude of the surface waves can be measured precisely enough, phase velocities can be corrected and the artefacts which occur due to reflections and diffractions in 3-D structures greatly reduced.