Outcomes of mentored, grant-funded fellowship training in haemostasis /thrombosis: findings from a nested case–control survey study

Authors

  • N. A. GOLDENBERG,

    1. Section of Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplantation and the Mountain States Regional Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
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    •  These authors contributed equally.

  • R. KRUSE-JARRES,

    1. Section of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, The Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA
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    •  These authors contributed equally.

  • N. FRICK,

    1. National Hemophilia Foundation, New York, NY
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  • S. W. PIPE,

    1. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan Health System and C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI;
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  • C. A. LEISSINGER,

    1. Section of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, The Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA
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  • C. M. KESSLER

    1. Section of Hematology and Hemophilia and Thrombophilia Center, Department of Medicine, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA
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Neil Goldenberg, MD, PhD, Mountain States Regional Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, University of Colorado, P.O. Box 6507, Aurora, CO 80045-0507, USA.
Tel.: +303 724 7028; fax: +303 724 0078;
e-mail: neil.goldenberg@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

Summary.  Successful strategies by which to effectively recruit and retain academic subspecialists in benign haematology have not been established. To evaluate the effectiveness of a grant-funded, mentored fellowship with respect to retention and early career goals in haemostasis/thrombosis, we sought to compare outcomes for graduates of a grant-funded, mentored fellowship training programme in haemostasis/thrombosis [the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF)-Baxter Clinical Fellowship Award] during conventional haematology/oncology fellowship training (cases), vs. their training peers who were graduates of conventional haematology/oncology fellowship training alone (controls), via a nested case-control survey study. Survey response rate was 85% (11/13) for cases and 90% (9/10) for controls. All respondents had pursued careers in academic haematology/oncology. Median (range) percent time spent in benign haematology postfellowship was 98% (70–100%) for cases vs. 0% (0–20%) for controls. Time spent in research was significantly greater among cases than controls (median 80% [range: 42–90%] vs. 55% [10–80%], respectively; P = 0.01). By years 3–4 postfellowship, median annual number of peer-reviewed publications was higher for cases than controls (3.5 vs. 1.0; P = 0.01). Cases were also more successful in grant funding (including K-awards). These data suggest that a grant-funded, mentored fellowship training programme in haemostasis/thrombosis may be superior to conventional haematology/oncology fellowship training alone with respect to outcomes of retention in clinical care/research, early-career grant funding and publication productivity.

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