Get access

Gene structure and expression of nanos (nos) and oskar (osk) orthologues of the vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

Authors

  • J. Juhn,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA;
    2. Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA; and
    Search for more papers by this author
  • O. Marinotti,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA;
    Search for more papers by this author
  • E. Calvo,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA;
    2. Medical Entomology Section, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. A. James

    1. Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA;
    2. Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA; and
    Search for more papers by this author

Dr. Anthony A. James, Departments of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics and Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, 3205 McGaugh Hall, University of California, Irvine CA 92697-3900, USA. Tel.: +1 949 824-5930; fax: +1 949 824-2814; E-mail: aajames@uci.edu

Abstract

The products of the maternal-effect genes, nanos (nos) and oskar (osk), are important for the development of germ cells in insects. Furthermore, these genes have been proposed as candidates for donating functional DNA regulatory sequences for use in gene drive systems to control transmission of mosquito-borne pathogens. The nos and osk genes of the cosmopolitan vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, encode proteins with domains common to orthologues found in other mosquitoes. Expression analyses support the conclusion that the role of these genes is conserved generally among members of the nematocera. Hybridization in situ analyses reveal differences in mRNA distribution in early embryos in comparison with the cyclorraphan, Drosophila melanogaster, highlighting a possible feature in the divergence of the clades each insect represents.

Ancillary