harrow: new Drosophila hAT transposons involved in horizontal transfer

Authors

  • N. R. Mota,

    1. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Genética e Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Genética, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; and
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  • A. Ludwig,

    1. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Genética e Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Genética, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; and
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  • V. L. Da Silva Valente,

    1. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Genética e Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Genética, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; and
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  • E. L. S. Loreto

    Corresponding author
    1. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Genética e Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Genética, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; and
    2. Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Campus Universitário, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
      Elgion L. S. Loreto, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Campus Universitário, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 97105-900. Tel.: +55 55 3220 8912; fax: +55 55 3220 8912; e-mail: elgion.loreto@pq.cnpq.br
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Elgion L. S. Loreto, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Campus Universitário, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 97105-900. Tel.: +55 55 3220 8912; fax: +55 55 3220 8912; e-mail: elgion.loreto@pq.cnpq.br

Abstract

In this study we characterize the transposable elements harrow, which belong to the hAT superfamily of DNA transposons. Searches for harrow sequences were performed in 65 Drosophilidae species, mainly representing Neotropical and cosmopolitan groups from the genus Drosophila. The nucleotide divergence among elements found in these species suggests that harrow sequences could be clustered in a subfamily. The patchy distribution throughout the genus Drosophila and the high similarity presented between all harrow sequences indicate that horizontal transfer could play a major role in the evolution of harrow elements. The results obtained suggest an evolutionary scenario in which harrow would have undergone multiple horizontal transfer events in the Neotropics, involving D. tripuncatata, D. mojavensis (Subgenus Drosophila) and several species of the willistoni and saltans groups (subgenus Sophophora).

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