Gene expression microarray analysis of heat stress in the soil invertebrate Folsomia candida

Authors

  • B. Nota,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Animal Ecology, VU University Amsterdam, Institute of Ecological Science, Amsterdam; and
      Benjamin Nota, Department of Animal Ecology, VU University Amsterdam, Institute of Ecological Science, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Tel.: +31 20 5987 217; e-mail: benjamin.nota@gmail.com
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  • N. M. Van Straalen,

    1. Department of Animal Ecology, VU University Amsterdam, Institute of Ecological Science, Amsterdam; and
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  • B. Ylstra,

    1. Department of Pathology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • D. Roelofs

    1. Department of Animal Ecology, VU University Amsterdam, Institute of Ecological Science, Amsterdam; and
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Benjamin Nota, Department of Animal Ecology, VU University Amsterdam, Institute of Ecological Science, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Tel.: +31 20 5987 217; e-mail: benjamin.nota@gmail.com

Abstract

Sudden temperature changes in soil can induce stress in soil-dwelling invertebrates. Hyperthermic conditions have an impact on gene expression as one of the first steps. We use a transcriptomics approach using microarrays to identify expression changes in response to heat in the springtail Folsomia candida. An elevation of temperature (Δ 10 °C) altered the expression of 142 genes (116 up-, 26 down-regulated). Many up-regulated genes encoded heat shock proteins, enzymes involved in ATP synthesis, oxidative stress responsive enzymes and anion-transporting ATPases. Down-regulated were glycoside hydrolases, involved in catalysis of disaccharides. The small number of altered transcripts suggest a mild response to heat in this soil invertebrate, but further research is needed to confirm this. This study presents candidate genes for future functional studies concerning thermal stress in soil-dwelling invertebrates.

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