A radiographic assessment of the prevalence of pulp stones in a group of Turkish dental patients

Authors


Ayse Gulsahi, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Baskent University, 11. sok. no:26 06490 Bahcelievler, Ankara, Turkey (Tel.: +90 312 215 13 36; fax: +90 312 215 29 62; e-mail: agulsahi@baskent.edu.tr).

Abstract

Aim  To determine the prevalence of pulp stones in a group of patients using radiographs, and to assess any associations with age, gender, systemic diseases, tooth type, jaw, caries, restorations, impacted third molars and dental anomalies including dens invaginatus, taurodontism, dens evaginatus and microdontia.

Methodology  A total of 519 patients were selected randomly amongst patients referred to Oral Diagnosis and Radiology Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University. After clinical inspection, full-mouth periapical radiographs were obtained. An oral radiologist examined the radiographs to identify pulp stones. Frequency distribution of teeth with pulp stones was calculated and statistical analysis was performed with chi-square test.

Results  Of the patients, 313 (60%) were female and 206 (40%) were male. Sixty (12%) had one or more teeth that contained pulp stones. Amongst the 13 474 teeth examined radiographically, 627 (5%) had pulp stones. There was no significant association between pulp stone occurrence and gender or systemic diseases. As age increased, the prevalence of pulp stones increased (< 0.01). Molars had statistically more pulp stones than premolars and incisors (< 0.001). Frequencies in both maxillary and mandibular jaw were similar. There was no association between pulp stones and impacted third molars, caries, restorations or dental anomalies.

Conclusions  The prevalence of pulp stones increased with age and was significantly higher in molar teeth than premolars and incisors. There was no significant association between pulp stones and gender, systemic diseases, impacted third molars, condition of the crown and dental anomalies.

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