CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF THE SEED OF SUNFLOWER HYBRIDS AND OPEN POLLINATED VARIETIES

Authors


  • Presented at the AOCS-ISF World Congress, Chicago, Ill., September, 1970.

  • Seed samples were obtained from the following: W.T. Fike, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C.; J.A. Martin, Clemson University, Clemson, S.C.; D.L. Thurlow, Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.; B.J. Johnson, Georgia Experiment Station, Experiment, Ga.: W.H. Marchant, Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Ga.; B.E. Newman, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La.; M.K. Kinman, Crops Research Division, USDA, ARS, College Station, Tex.

Abstract

SUMMARY— The seed of high oil hybrids and open pollinated sunflower varieties from experimental plantings at nine locations in six southern states in 1969 was analyzed for moisture, crude protein, total oil and fatty acid composition. Total oil content ranged from 28.8–44.7% with an average of 35.3% for hybrid varieties and 39.5% for open pollinated varieties. The crude protein ranged from 16.9–25.1%. All the introductions mere relatively low in palmitic and stearic acids. Small amounts of palmitoleic, linolenic, arachidic, behenic and lignoceric acids were present in all samples. Oleic acid ranged from 33.4–62.7% and linoleic acid from 27.3–54.2%. The average oleic and linoleic acid content of the open pollinated varieties at the nine locations was 46.6 and 41.6%, respectively, as compared to 49.4 and 39.6% for the hybrids. The linoleic acid content of sunflower oil varied inversely with temperature during development of the seed. The oil of the sunflowers grown at the warmer locations and at the lower latitudes had a lower linoleic acid content than of those grown at somewhat cooler locations and higher latitudes.

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