ROLE OF PHOSPHOLIPIDS AND TRIGLYCERIDES IN WARMED-OVER FLAVOR DEVELOPMENT IN MEAT MODEL SYSTEMS

Authors

  • J. O. IGENE,

    1. Author Pearson is with the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824. Author Igene, formerly affiliated with Michigan State Univ., is now with the National Horticulture Research Institute, P.M.6. 5432, Ibadan, Nigeria.
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  • A. M. PEARSON

    1. Author Pearson is with the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824. Author Igene, formerly affiliated with Michigan State Univ., is now with the National Horticulture Research Institute, P.M.6. 5432, Ibadan, Nigeria.
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  • Presented at 38th Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, Dallas, TX, June 4–7, 1978.

  • Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Article No. 8860. This manuscript is a portion of a thesis submitted by the senior author in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Ph.D. degree at Michigan State University.

  • This study is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Research Grant No. ENG 76–04591.

ABSTRACT

The effects of triglycerides and phospholipids on development of warmed-over flavor (WOF) in cooked meat was studied using model systems from beef and from chicken dark and light meat. Triglycerides, total lipids, total phospholipids, phosphatidyl choline (PC) and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE) were added back to the lipid extracted muscle fibers in each system and WOF development was followed by the TBA test and taste panel scores after heating to 70°C and holding at 4°C for 48 hr. Total phospholipids, especially PE, were shown to be the major contributors to development of WOF in cooked meat. The triglycerides enhanced development of WOF only when combined with the phospholipids (as total lipids). Phosphatidyl choline (PC) did not influence WOF in the model system. Changes in the PUFAs of the phospholipids were shown to be related to development of WOF in cooked meat. Addition of 156 ppm of nitrite significantly (P < 0.01) reduced TBA numbers and prevented development of WOF.

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