INHIBITION OF AFLATOXIN PRODUCTION BY CARROT ROOT EXTRACT

Authors

  • CARL BATT,

    1. Authors Barr, Solberg, and Ceponis are with the Dept. of Food Science, Rutgers—The State University, Cook College, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
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  • MYRON SOLBERG,

    1. Authors Barr, Solberg, and Ceponis are with the Dept. of Food Science, Rutgers—The State University, Cook College, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
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  • MICHAEL CEPONIS

    1. Authors Barr, Solberg, and Ceponis are with the Dept. of Food Science, Rutgers—The State University, Cook College, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
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  • Paper of the Journal Series, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick. New Jersey.

  • This work was performed as a part of NJAES Project Nos. 806 and 850, supported by the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA Specific Cooperative Agreement, and Regional Research Funds.

ABSTRACT

The worldwide incidence of aflatoxin contamination of carrot roots is rare. This study was conducted to determine the potential of carrot root to support Aspergillus parasiticus growth and aflatoxin production. Raw carrot tissue did not support the germination of A. parasiticus spores. Autoclaved (121°C, 15 min) carrot tissue supported germination, growth, sporulation, and aflatoxin production by A. parasiticus. There was no measureable difference in water activity before or after autoclaving the carrot tissue. There was an increase in water extractable carbohydrate and protein as a result of autoclaving the carrot tissue. Chloroform extracts of carrot tissue contained a compound that inhibited differentiation and aflatoxin production by A. parasiticus in both synthetic and semisynthetic media. The inhibitor was optimally active within a pH range 3.5—4.0. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract at pH 4.5 and at 28°C in minimal salts medium containing 6% glucose and 1.7 × 105A. parasiticus spores was 3.84g equivalent weight of tissue/ml assay medium.

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