Sensory, Physical, and Cooking Characteristics of Bacon Processed with Varying Levels of Sodium Nitrite and Potassium Sorbate

Authors

  • B. W. BERRY,

    1. Author Berry is with the Meat Science Research Laboratory, SEAAR, USDA, Beltsville MD 20705. Author Blumer is with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27650.
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  • T. N. BLUMER

    1. Author Berry is with the Meat Science Research Laboratory, SEAAR, USDA, Beltsville MD 20705. Author Blumer is with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27650.
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  • Presented at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, New Orleans, La., June 8–11, 1980.

  • Assistance and financial support was provided by the Food Safety & Quality Service U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.

  • Mention of specific trade names and companies is for identification purposes and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

ABSTRACT

Sensory, physical, and cooking properties were evaluated on bacon processed under commercial operations in four separate plants. Three formulations with various levels of sodium nitrite and potassium sorbate were used: (1) 0 ppm sodium nitrite, (2) 40 ppm sodium nitrite 2600 ppm potassium sorbate, and (3) 120 ppm sodium nitrite. Sliced bacon was evaluated after 10, 30, 50, and 70 days of storage. “Chemical”-like flavors, prickly mouth sensations, and “sweet aromatic” aromas were found in bacon processed with 40 ppm sodium nitrite and 2600 ppm potassium sorbate. “Microbial” flavors were found in 0 ppm sodium nitrite bacon after 50 and 70 days of storage. Bacon stored for 30 days had less cooking loss and sensory panel scores indicative of more mouth coating with fat than did bacon stored for 10 days. The degree of leanness in bacon strips had more of an influence on textural, physical, and cooking characteristics than did sodium nitrite and potassium sorbate levels.

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