Effects of Chloride Salt, Method of Manufacturing and Frozen Storage on Sensory Properties of Restructured Pork Roasts

Authors

  • L. W. HAND,

    1. Author Hand, formerly with the Meats and Muscle Biology Section, Dept, of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ., is with Teepak Inc., Danville, IL 61832. Address inquiries to Dr. Terrell.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • R. N. TERRELL,

    1. Authors Terrell and Smith are with the Meats and Muscle Biology Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX 77843.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • G. C. SMITH

    1. Authors Terrell and Smith are with the Meats and Muscle Biology Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX 77843.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • T.A. 17419 from the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. This project contributed to TAES projects H-6315 and HM-6267.

ABSTRACT

Pork shoulders were used to make two replications of restructured roast by the following methods: (1) grinder with 3-hole “kidney shaped” plate and a conventional knife with four full-length arms; (2) grinder with 3-hole “kidney shaped” plate and a special knife with two half-length arms and; (3) Comitrol machine with a 6.35 mm headsize. Sodium chloride was replaced with an equivalent ionic strength of potassium chloride in one-half of the roasts made by each method. Frozen storage period (1 or 4 wk) did not (P7>0.05) affect sensory properties of cooked roasts. However, roasts made with potassium chloride had more off-flavor than roasts made with sodium chloride (P<0.05). Roasts made by the Comitrol method had more off-flavor and less whole muscle-like mouthfeel than those made by the grind-mix method using a knife with two half-length arms (P<0.05).

Ancillary