Selected Nutrients in Ground and Mechanically Separated Veal

Authors

  • LOUIS L. YOUNG,

    1. The authors are affiliated with the USDA-ARS, Meat Quality Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, P.O. Box 5677, Athens, GA 30613.
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  • G. K. SEARCY,

    1. The authors are affiliated with the USDA-ARS, Meat Quality Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, P.O. Box 5677, Athens, GA 30613.
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  • L. C. BLANKENSHIP,

    1. The authors are affiliated with the USDA-ARS, Meat Quality Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, P.O. Box 5677, Athens, GA 30613.
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  • J. SALINSKY,

    1. The authors are affiliated with the USDA-ARS, Meat Quality Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, P.O. Box 5677, Athens, GA 30613.
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  • DOUGLAS HAMM

    1. The authors are affiliated with the USDA-ARS, Meat Quality Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, P.O. Box 5677, Athens, GA 30613.
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ABSTRACT

Paired samples of ground veal (GV) and mechanically separated veal (MSV) were analyzed for moisture, protein, crude fat, ash, cholesterol, purine bases and nucleic acids. The MSV product was lower than the GV in protein and hypoxanthine and higher in crude fat, ash, cholesterol, adenine and guanine, DNA and total nucleic acids than the ground product. There were no differences between the products in moisture, xanthine, RNA or total purines. The data are limited but indicate that until more data are available, care should be exercised in using high levels of this product in formulations to be consumed by people with a tendency to hyperuricemia or hypercholesterolemia.

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