The Finite Element Method in Thermal Processing of Foods

Authors

  • D. NAVEH,

    1. Author Naveh is affiliated with the College of Agricultural & Life Sciences, Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706. Author Kopelman is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Engineering & Biotechnology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. Author Pflug is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Nutrition, Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • I. J. KOPELMAN,

    1. Author Naveh is affiliated with the College of Agricultural & Life Sciences, Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706. Author Kopelman is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Engineering & Biotechnology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. Author Pflug is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Nutrition, Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • I. J. PFLUG

    1. Author Naveh is affiliated with the College of Agricultural & Life Sciences, Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706. Author Kopelman is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Engineering & Biotechnology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. Author Pflug is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Nutrition, Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This research was supported in part by a grant from the U.S. Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund (BARD) I-32–75 and HHS/FDA Contract 223–74–2258. Scientific journal Series 999. Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Paul, MN 55108.

ABSTRACT

A variational finite element approach using triangular simplex and 2nd order quadrilateral elements was employed to analyze several problem areas that are of practical importance in the thermal processing of conduction heating products: (1) A method was developed to calculate conversion factors for thermal process design applicable to glass jars filled with conduction heating products. (2) The overshooting of temperatures after steam-off was studied, indicating that not including the contribution of overshooting to sterilization values in process design, can lead to gross overprocessing. (3) A method of correcting sterilization values to account for harmonious fluctuations in retort temperature was developed. (4) The air cooling of cans by natural convection was analyzed.

Ancillary