Effect of Selected Organic Acids on the Pitting of Tinplate Cans in Model Systems

Authors

  • D. R. DAVIS,

    1. Author Davis is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Arkansas, Route 11, Fayetteville, AR 72701. Author Breedlove, formerly with the Univ. of Arkansas, is now with Bryan Foods, P.O. Box 1007, Little Rock, AR 72203.
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  • A. L. BREEDLOVE

    1. Author Davis is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Arkansas, Route 11, Fayetteville, AR 72701. Author Breedlove, formerly with the Univ. of Arkansas, is now with Bryan Foods, P.O. Box 1007, Little Rock, AR 72203.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Presented at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, Las Vegas, NV, June 22–25, 1982.

ABSTRACT

A model system of six organic acids found in green beans was prepared using two acid concentrations, two pH ranges, and two nitrate concentrations packed in conventional and double reduced tinplate cans. Can pitting severity was determined after 6- and 12-month storage periods. The pH increased with storage, but type of acid was more important than concentration and pH on pitting severity. The composite treatment of all six acids gave the lowest can pitting severity. Each acid treatment had a different can pitting profile. The can type was the most important factor affecting can pitting.

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