Physiological Responses of Rats to High Fiber Bread Diets Containing Several Sources of Hulls or Bran

Authors

  • A. M. CADDEN,

    1. Author Olson is with the College of Home Economics, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0W0. Author Cadden, formerly with the Dept. of Crop Science & Plant Ecology, is now affiliated with the Dept. of Foods & Nutrition, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M8.
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  • F. W. SOSULSKI,

    1. Author Olson is with the College of Home Economics, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0W0. Author Cadden, formerly with the Dept. of Crop Science & Plant Ecology, is now affiliated with the Dept. of Foods & Nutrition, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M8.
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  • J. P. OLSON

    1. Author Olson is with the College of Home Economics, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0W0. Author Cadden, formerly with the Dept. of Crop Science & Plant Ecology, is now affiliated with the Dept. of Foods & Nutrition, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M8.
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  • The technical assistance of Mr. H. Braitenbach and Mrs. D. Knapp is gratefully acknowledged. Financial assistance was provided by the Natural Sciences & Engineering Research Council and the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool.

ABSTRACT

Fiber-supplemented breads, prepared by replacing 7.5% of the hard wheat flour with field pea, flax or sunflower hulls, wheat bran or microcrystalline cellulose, were evaluated for breadmaking characteristics and physiological effects on rats. Cellulose-supplemented dough and bread resembled the straight-grade wheat bread while pea hull and wheat bran breads were similar to whole wheat bread. Flax and sunflower hulls had adverse effects on dough mixograph properties, loaf volume and crumb characteristics while sunflower hulls also contributed grittiness and aftertaste in taste panel evaluations. The fiber-supplemented breads, when fed to weanling rats, gave similar feed consumptions, weight gains and serum cholesterol levels as rats fed the whole wheat bread. Pea hulls increased daily fecal weight and, with coarse sunflower hulls, decreased dry matter digestibility. Fine wheat bran and fine sunflower hulls in the bread diets were associated with low fecal weight, low fecal volume, high fecal density and high digestibility of dry matter.

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