Composition of Raw and Cooked Potato Peel and Flesh: Amino Acid Content

Authors

  • E. A. TALLEY,

    1. Author Talley is with the USDA-ARS, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 E. Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19118. Author Toma is with the Dept. of Home Economics & Nutrition, Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, NO 58202. Author Orr is with the Red River Valley Potato Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, East Grand Forks, MN 56721.
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  • R. B. TOMA,

    1. Author Talley is with the USDA-ARS, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 E. Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19118. Author Toma is with the Dept. of Home Economics & Nutrition, Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, NO 58202. Author Orr is with the Red River Valley Potato Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, East Grand Forks, MN 56721.
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  • P. H. ORR

    1. Author Talley is with the USDA-ARS, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 E. Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19118. Author Toma is with the Dept. of Home Economics & Nutrition, Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, NO 58202. Author Orr is with the Red River Valley Potato Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, East Grand Forks, MN 56721.
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ABSTRACT

The nitrogen and total amino acid contents of Katahdin and Pontiac varieties of potatoes are reported for the peel and flesh, before and after cooking. With the exception of glutamic acid and 7-amino-butyric acid, all of the contents were higher in the peel. Losses of nitrogen and amino acids were minor in boiling whole potatoes but greater in oven baking in the peel or in boiling the peeled potato. Microwave cooking losses were less than in oven baking.

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