Preparation of High Protein Curd from Field Peas

Authors

  • A. GEBRE-EGZIABHER,

    1. Author Sumner, to whom inquiries should be directed, is affiliated with the College of Home Economics, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 0W0. Author A. Gebre-Egziabher, formerly with the College of Home Economics, Univ. of Saskatchewan, is now affiliated with the Dept. of Applied Microbiology & Food Science, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 0W0.
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  • A. K. SUMNER

    1. Author Sumner, to whom inquiries should be directed, is affiliated with the College of Home Economics, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 0W0. Author A. Gebre-Egziabher, formerly with the College of Home Economics, Univ. of Saskatchewan, is now affiliated with the Dept. of Applied Microbiology & Food Science, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 0W0.
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  • The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by the Saskatchewan Research Council and NSERC general funds. Processed pea samples were prepared by the National Research Council. Technical support was provided by H. Braitenbach and B. van Meter.

ABSTRACT

Field peas were investigated as an alternative to soybeans to produce a high protein curd which resembles tofu. Yield, texture, color, proximate composition and sensory evaluation of both curds were compared. The yields of total curd from pea flour and soybeans were 13.6% and 39.8% respectively with protein yields of 43.0% and 55.5%. Amino acid composition of the pea curd compared quite closely to that of the soybean curd. Addition of gluten improved the sulfur amino acid profile but reduced the lysine content. Flavor of the pea and soybean curds was rated similar but texture and color of the pea curd was scored lower (p < 0.05). Gluten modified the texture and the color of the curds.

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