Ames Test for Mutagenicity on Pacific Whiting Treated with Hydrogen Peroxide

Authors

  • VIRGINIA STOUT,

    1. Author Stout is affiliated with the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest & Alaska Fisheries Center, Utilization Research Div., 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112. Author Carter, a participant in the Minority Faculty Development Program at the Northwest & Alaska Fisheries Center, was affiliated with Jarvis Christian College, Hawkins, TX 75765. Her current address is Division of Biochemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, North Texas State Univ., Denton, TX 76202.
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  • GLENDORA CARTER

    1. Author Stout is affiliated with the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest & Alaska Fisheries Center, Utilization Research Div., 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112. Author Carter, a participant in the Minority Faculty Development Program at the Northwest & Alaska Fisheries Center, was affiliated with Jarvis Christian College, Hawkins, TX 75765. Her current address is Division of Biochemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, North Texas State Univ., Denton, TX 76202.
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  • Presented at the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Pacific Fisheries Technologists, Sacramento, CA, March 21–24, 1982.

  • The authors acknowledge the advice throughout this research and the critical review of the manuscript by Ruth Miller. She also determined the peroxide and parasite levels in the samples. J.A. Dassow, G.A. Pelroy, P.W. Sieverling, Jr., and Drs. G.H. Stout and J.C. Wekell assisted with editing.

  • Mention of firm names or trade products does not constitute endorsement by the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA.

ABSTRACT

Raw Pacific whiting (Merluccius productus) treated with hydrogen peroxide or potassium bromate was tested for mutagenicity by the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA 98 and TA 100 without and with S-9 activation. To examine the effects of long-term exposure, cooked whiting treated with hydrogen peroxide and stored up to 6 months at -26°C was also tested. In contrast to the raw-treated fish, the cooked sample contained 78% catalasereactive peroxide up to 6 months later. For testing, acidic, neutral and basic fractions were obtained by modifying the procedure of Felton et al. (Mutat. Res., 1981) to reduce emulsion formation. No extract from either potassium bromate or hydrogen peroxide treatment produced mutagens.

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