On Sodium Chloride Action in the Gelation Process of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) from Hen Egg Yolk

Authors

  • T. WAKAMATU,

    1. Authors Wakamatu and Saito are affiliated with the Basic Research Laboratory, Q.P. Co., Sengawa-cho, Chofu, Tokyo 182, Japan. Author Sato is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya 464, Japan.
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  • Y. SATO,

    1. Authors Wakamatu and Saito are affiliated with the Basic Research Laboratory, Q.P. Co., Sengawa-cho, Chofu, Tokyo 182, Japan. Author Sato is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya 464, Japan.
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  • Y. SAITO

    1. Authors Wakamatu and Saito are affiliated with the Basic Research Laboratory, Q.P. Co., Sengawa-cho, Chofu, Tokyo 182, Japan. Author Sato is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya 464, Japan.
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ABSTRACT

Gelation of 40% LDL solution with 1~10% NaCl was inhibited during frozen storage at −20°C and −25°C. Frozen storage of LDL solutions with more than 4% NaCl at −30°C, −40°C and −60°C induced the gelation, whereas gelation was inhibited by addition of 1 and 2% NaCl at temperatures lower than −30°C. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses revealed that when NaCl acts as an inhibitor of gelation, it increased the unfrozen water in the LDL solutions through formation of LDL-water-NaCl complex where the water is hardly frozen; and when it acts as an accelerator of gelation, it promoted removal of water from the complex.

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