Effects of Essential Oils from Plants on Growth of Food Spoilage Yeasts

Authors

  • D. E. CONNER,

    1. Authors Conner and Beuchat are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Georgia, Agricultural Experiment Station, Experiment, GA 30212.
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  • L. R. BEUCHAT

    1. Authors Conner and Beuchat are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Georgia, Agricultural Experiment Station, Experiment, GA 30212.
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  • This research was supported in part by a grant from Fritzsche, Dodge, and Olcott, Inc., New York, NY. We are grateful for this assistance.

ABSTRACT

Thirty-two essential oils from plants were screened for inhibitory effects on 13 food-spoilage and industrial yeasts. Of these, essential oils of allspice, cinnamon, clove, garlic, onion, oregano, savory, and thyme were most inhibitory. Oils were subsequently tested for their effects on biomass production and pseudomycelium formation of eight genera of yeasts. Garlic oil was a potent inhibitor of yeast growth at concentrations as low as 25 ppm. The oils of onion, oregano and thyme were also strongly inhibitory. Essential oils (100 ppm) had no effect on pseudomycelium production by Candida lipolytica. However, all eight essential oils delayed pseudomycelium formation by Hansenula anomala, whereas six oils stimulated pseudomycelium production by Lodderomyces elongisporus. Cinnamon and clove oils were clearly stimulatory to pseudomycelium production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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