Growth of Clostridium sporogenes and Staphylococcus aureus at Different Temperatures in Cooked Corned Beef Made with Reduced Levels of Sodium Chloride

Authors

  • R. C. WHITING,

    1. Authors Whiting, Benedict, Kunsch, and Blalock are with the USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia. PA 19118.
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  • R. C. BENEDICT,

    1. Authors Whiting, Benedict, Kunsch, and Blalock are with the USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia. PA 19118.
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  • C. A. KUNSCH,

    1. Authors Whiting, Benedict, Kunsch, and Blalock are with the USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia. PA 19118.
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  • D. BLALOCK

    1. Authors Whiting, Benedict, Kunsch, and Blalock are with the USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia. PA 19118.
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  • The authors acknowledge advice and assistance by members of the USDA Microbiological Safety Group, Food Safety Laboratory, ERRC, Philadelphia. PA.

  • Reference to a brand or firm name does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture over others of a similar nature not mentioned.

ABSTRACT

Cooked corned beef made with normal (ca.2.5%) or a reduced (ca.1.5%) level of salt were inoculated with either clostridial spores or with staphylococci and incubated at temperatures ranging from 5 - 30°C. Growth of indigenous microflora, staphylococci, or clostridia was similar at both salt levels at a given incubation temperature. However, increasing the abuse temperature greatly increased the growth of all organisms. Outgrowth of clostridial spores occurred in ground cooked corned beef which contained the normal residual nitrite of 40 - 45 ppm; readdition of nitrite to 150 ppm at the time of inoculation markedly reduced growth. Gas production was not a good indicator of clostridial growth.

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