Moisture Transfer Properties of Dry and Semimoist Foods

Authors

  • C. J. LOMAURO,

    1. Authors Lomauro, Bakshi, and Labuza are affiliated with the Dept, of Food Science & Nutrition, Univ. of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Ave., St. Paul, MN 55113.
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  • A.S. BAKSHI,

    1. Authors Lomauro, Bakshi, and Labuza are affiliated with the Dept, of Food Science & Nutrition, Univ. of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Ave., St. Paul, MN 55113.
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  • T. P. LABUZA

    1. Authors Lomauro, Bakshi, and Labuza are affiliated with the Dept, of Food Science & Nutrition, Univ. of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Ave., St. Paul, MN 55113.
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  • Presented at the 44th Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, Anaheim, CA, June 10 - 13, 1984.

  • Journal Series No. 13,999 from the Univ. of Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station. The research was supported by the Univ. of Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station projects 18-82 and 18-72

ABSTRACT

Equilibrium moisture content, mass diffusion coefficients, and densities were collected for wheat flour, shredded wheat, raisins, nonfat dry milk, and freeze-dried apple, turnip, and ground beef at 25 ± 1°C. Flour adsorbing to 0.75 aw had the largest mass diffusion co-efficient, 1.15 × 10−7 m2/hr and raisins had the smallest value of 0.015 × 10-7 m2/hr. Two of the food uroducts. flour desorbing to 0.11 aw, and the freeze-dried turnip, exhibited diffusion coeffcients which were dependent on the moisture content. Most of the foods reached equilibrium within 1 wk based on an objective criterion of no more than a 0.5% dry basis moisture difference over three successive readings at 1 wk interval.

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