Effect of Heat Treatment on Bioavailability of Meat and Hemoglobin Iron Fed to Anemic Rats

Authors

  • O. JANSUITTIVECHAKUL,

    1. Author Jansuittivechakul is now with the Dept. of Food Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok 10500, Thailand.
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  • A.W. MAHONEY,

    1. Authors Mahoney, Cornforth, and Hendricks are affiliated with the Dept. of Nutrition & Food Sciences, UMC 87, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322.
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  • D.P. CORNFORTH,

    1. Authors Mahoney, Cornforth, and Hendricks are affiliated with the Dept. of Nutrition & Food Sciences, UMC 87, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322.
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  • D.G. HENDRICKS,

    1. Authors Mahoney, Cornforth, and Hendricks are affiliated with the Dept. of Nutrition & Food Sciences, UMC 87, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322.
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  • K. KANGSADALAMPAI

    1. Author Kangsadalampai is presently with the Institute of Nutrition, Mahidal Univ., Bangkok 10400, Thailand. Address reprint requests to Dr. A. W. Mahoney.
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  • Utah State Univ. Agricultural Experiment Station Journal article number 3015. This research was supported by a National Science Foundation grant (NSF/PFR-79-19664).

ABSTRACT

Efficiency of converting dietary iron from meat, bovine hemoglobin (HB) and ferrous sulfate into hemoglobin was investigated in anemic rats. Raw or autoclaved HB, and raw, autoclaved, boiled, or baked beef round, and ferrous sulfate were mixed into diets to give 36 mg Fe/kg diet. Heat treatments increased the efficiency of converting both HB and meat iron into hemoglobin by the anemic rats. Efficiencies of conversion were 23, 30, 33, 37, 37, 36 or 60 (LSD 0.05/0.01 = 4/6), respectively, for raw HB, autoclaved HB, raw meat, autoclaved meat, boiled meat, baked meat or ferrous sulfate. An in vitro measurement of iron availability in meat correlated poorly with bioavailability determined in rats. Cooking did not significantly affect the bioavailability of meat iron.

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