Effect of Phosphates on Bacterial Growth in Refrigerated Uncooked Bratwurst

Authors

  • R. A. MOLINS,

    1. All authors are at Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011. Authors Molins and Kraft are with the Dept. of Food Technology; author Olson is with the Dept. of Animal Science.
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  • A. A. KRAFT,

    1. All authors are at Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011. Authors Molins and Kraft are with the Dept. of Food Technology; author Olson is with the Dept. of Animal Science.
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  • D. G. OLSON

    1. All authors are at Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011. Authors Molins and Kraft are with the Dept. of Food Technology; author Olson is with the Dept. of Animal Science.
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  • Presented, in part. at the 44th Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, Anaheim, CA, June 1984.

  • Journal Paper No. J-11577 of the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station, Ames, IA. Project No. 2252.

  • Mention of any company or product name does not constitute endorsement.

  • The authors thank Stephanie Kielsmeier for preparation of the manuscript and Steve Niebuhr for his laboratory assistance.

ABSTRACT

The effects of 0.5% sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) and sodium polyphosphate glassy (SPC) on aerobic mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacterial growth and on survival of inoculated Stuphylococcus aureus Z 88 were investigated in uncooked bratwurst stored at 5°C for 7 days. No significant microbial inhibition by phosphates was found, although SAPP addition resulted in consistently lower total aerobic plate counts. Phosphate-induced pH differences in the sausages had no effect on bacterial numbers. The possible role of meat enzymes in the hydrolysis of condensed phosphates to microbiologically inactive species is discussed.

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