Rheological Properties of Tomato Concentrates as Affected by Particle Size and Methods of Concentration

Authors

  • T. TANGLERTPAIBUL,

    1. Author Rao is with the Dept. of food Science & Technology, Cornell Univ., NYS Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456. Author Tanglertpaibul (nee Sornsrivichai), formerly with Cornell Univ., is with Mah Boonkrong Center, Bangkok, Thailand. Address inquiries to Dr. Rao.
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  • M. A. RAO

    1. Author Rao is with the Dept. of food Science & Technology, Cornell Univ., NYS Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456. Author Tanglertpaibul (nee Sornsrivichai), formerly with Cornell Univ., is with Mah Boonkrong Center, Bangkok, Thailand. Address inquiries to Dr. Rao.
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  • One of us (TS) was the recipient of a scholarship from the Anandha Mahidol Foundation, Bangkok, Thailand. This work also was supported by funds from the Hatch act.

  • Based on a paper presented at the 46th Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, June 15–18, Dallas, TX.

ABSTRACT

Shear rate-shear stress data were obtained on tomato concentrates made from juices that were produced using finisher screen openings (FSO): 0.020, 0.027, 0.033, and 0.045 in. In general, the apparent viscosity of the concentrates at a shear rate of 100 set-1 increased with increase in FSO. However, concentrates made from juice using a 0.027 in FSO had the highest apparent viscosity. Magnitudes of yield stress of concentrates increased in direct proportion to FSO. Apparent viscosities of concentrates made by evaporating tomato juice were lower than those obtained either by evaporating the serum or by reverse osmosis concentration of the serum.

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