Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterobacter Cloacae Growth In Cucumber Extracts Containing Various Salts

Authors

  • JOCELYN O. NAEWBANIJ,

    1. Author Stone is with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO 80523. Author Naewbanij is with Mahidol Univ., Bankok. Author Chambers is with the Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS 66506: Address inquiries and reprint requests to Dr. M.B. Stone.
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  • MARTHA B. STONE,

    1. Author Stone is with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO 80523. Author Naewbanij is with Mahidol Univ., Bankok. Author Chambers is with the Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS 66506: Address inquiries and reprint requests to Dr. M.B. Stone.
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  • EDGAR CHAMBERS IV

    1. Author Stone is with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO 80523. Author Naewbanij is with Mahidol Univ., Bankok. Author Chambers is with the Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS 66506: Address inquiries and reprint requests to Dr. M.B. Stone.
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  • Contribution No. 87–477-J from the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan, KS 66506.

ABSTRACT

Salt substitutes included chlorides, sulfates and phosphates at 25%, 50% and 100% ionic strength equivalent to a concentration of 1M NaCl. At 100% NaCl substitution, chloride salts provided the most selective environment and sulfates showed no selectivity, whereas phosphates suppressed microbial, growth. Substitution of sulfates for NaCl generally increased generation times for both microorganisms. Substitution of KCl for NaCl at 50%, resulted in more selective growth of L. plantarum than in those with either KCl or NaCl alone. KCl was the only chloride substitute allowing growth of E. cloacae. Substitution of phosphates for NaCl at 50% enabled slow growth of L. plantarum.

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