Calcium Bioavailability from Ripening Cheddar Cheese

Authors

  • MACIEJ S. BUCHOWSKI,

    1. Authors Buchowski and Miller are with the Institute of Food Science, New York State College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, Stocking Hall, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853.
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  • DENNIS D. MILLER

    1. Authors Buchowski and Miller are with the Institute of Food Science, New York State College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, Stocking Hall, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853.
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  • Presented, in part, at the 49th Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, Chicago, IL, June 25-29, 1989.

  • Supported by a grant from the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Grant No. 87-CRCR-1-2315.

  • We thank David Barbano and Robert Rasmussen for providing the milk and cheese samples and assistance with cheese manufacture and Terry Fowler for secretarial help.

ABSTRACT

Calcium bioavailability to rats was compared from CaCl2 (28 mM), CaCO3, fresh milk, milk adjusted to pH 5.35, and Cheddar cheese. The cheese was manufactured from pasteurized bovine milk and all doses were labeled extrinsically with 45Ca and 47Ca and administered orally to rats. One label (45Ca) was added to milk before cheese manufacture and the other (47Ca) was added to the cheese 24 h prior to dosing. Calcium bioavailability was determined by: 1) absorption measured by whole body counting, and 2) availability for bone metabolism assessed by bone radioactivity measurements. Calcium absorption averaged 76.8% and was not affected by length of ripening (p>0.05). Absorption from CaCl2, CaCO3, fresh milk, milk at pH 5.35, and the cheeses was similar. The two methods gave similar estimates of relative bioavailability. The ratio of 47Ca absorption to 45Ca absorption for any cheese sample was significantly greater than 1, indicating extrinsic labels added after processing may overestimate Ca absorption from cheese.

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