Volatile Components of the Fruit of Pistacia Lentiscus

Authors

  • S. GRANT WYLLIE,

    1. Authors Wyllie, Sarafis, and Hobbs are with the Dept. of Applied Sciences, The University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury, Richmond, NSW 2753, Australia. Author Brophy is with the School of Chemistry, Univ. of New South Wales, PO Box 1, Kensington, NSW 2033, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • JOSEPH J. BROPHY,

    1. Authors Wyllie, Sarafis, and Hobbs are with the Dept. of Applied Sciences, The University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury, Richmond, NSW 2753, Australia. Author Brophy is with the School of Chemistry, Univ. of New South Wales, PO Box 1, Kensington, NSW 2033, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • VASSILIOS SARAFIS,

    1. Authors Wyllie, Sarafis, and Hobbs are with the Dept. of Applied Sciences, The University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury, Richmond, NSW 2753, Australia. Author Brophy is with the School of Chemistry, Univ. of New South Wales, PO Box 1, Kensington, NSW 2033, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MICHAEL HOBBS

    1. Authors Wyllie, Sarafis, and Hobbs are with the Dept. of Applied Sciences, The University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury, Richmond, NSW 2753, Australia. Author Brophy is with the School of Chemistry, Univ. of New South Wales, PO Box 1, Kensington, NSW 2033, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author

ABSTRACT

The volatile components from the fruit of the Pistacia lentiscus tree were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and CGC-mass spectrometry. The major components were the monoterpenes α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene and limonene. Several sesquiterpenes, aliphatic esters, ketones, and phenolic compounds such as thymol and carvacrol were also identified.

Ancillary