Edible Methylcellulose-Based Films as Moisture-Impermeable Barriers in Sundae Ice Cream Cones

Authors

  • DELMY C. RICO-PEÑA,

    1. Author Torres is with the Food Engineering Group, Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331, Author Rico-Peha is now with the Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de El Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador.
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  • J. ANTONIO TORRES

    1. Author Torres is with the Food Engineering Group, Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331, Author Rico-Peha is now with the Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de El Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador.
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  • Oregon State Univ. Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Paper No. 9024.

  • The authors are grateful for the financial support provided by Drumstick Co. (Columbus, OH). Author Rico-Peña gratefully acknowledges the support from the Fulbright-Latin American Scholarshíp Program of American Universities (LASPAU) and the Universidad de El Salvador.

ABSTRACT

An edible bilayer film of methylcellulose and palmitic acid, 3:1 w/ w, and a pure methylcellulose film were tested as moisture-impermeable barriers in a simulated sundae ice cream cone. Circular pieces of film were arranged between the sugar cone and the chocolate layer of samples. Sugar cones of samples containing methylcellulose-palmitic acid films showed no detectable moisture increase for 10 weeks at -23°C and for 4 weeks at -12°C and only negligible increments after that. Moisture increase was greater in samples with pure methylcellulose films. Films retarded moisture transfer from ice cream to the sugar cone keeping its crispness longer than 3 months which is the commercial storage-life of the uncoated product.

Ancillary