Effect of Infrared Heat Processing on Rehydration Rate and Cooking of Phaseolus vulgaris (Var. Pinto)

Authors

  • ROHANI ABDUL-KADIR,

    1. Author Abdul-Kadir is with Jabatan Biokimia, Fakulti Sains Hayat, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Malaysia. Authors Bargman and Rupnow are with the Dept, of Food Science & Technology, Institute of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0919.
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  • TRACY J. BARGMAN,

    1. Author Abdul-Kadir is with Jabatan Biokimia, Fakulti Sains Hayat, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Malaysia. Authors Bargman and Rupnow are with the Dept, of Food Science & Technology, Institute of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0919.
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  • JOHN H. RUPNOW

    1. Author Abdul-Kadir is with Jabatan Biokimia, Fakulti Sains Hayat, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Malaysia. Authors Bargman and Rupnow are with the Dept, of Food Science & Technology, Institute of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0919.
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  • Published as paper no. 8942, Journal Series, Nebraska Agricultural Experimental Station. Research reported was conducted under Project No. 16-046.

  • The research work was supported by a grant from the Nebraska Dry Bean Commission.

ABSTRACT

Imbibition studies and cooking tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of infrared (IR)-heating on pinto beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) heated to 99°C and 107°C. IR-heating improved rehydration rate and increased degree of swelling of Pinto beans. Water absorption capacities and imbibition rates were higher for the 99°C than 107°C samples. However, tests showed IR-heating significantly increased cooking time of pinto beans.

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