Effect of Sodium Lactate on Microbial and Chemical Composition of Cooked Beef during Storage

Authors

  • L. S. PAPADOPOULOS,

    1. Authors Miller and Cross are with the Meats & Muscle Biology Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Authors Acuff and Vanderzant are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Author Papadopoulos’ present address: Oscar Mayer Foods Corp., Madison, Wl 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. R. K. Miller.
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  • R. K. MILLER,

    1. Authors Miller and Cross are with the Meats & Muscle Biology Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Authors Acuff and Vanderzant are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Author Papadopoulos’ present address: Oscar Mayer Foods Corp., Madison, Wl 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. R. K. Miller.
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  • G. R. ACUFF,

    1. Authors Miller and Cross are with the Meats & Muscle Biology Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Authors Acuff and Vanderzant are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Author Papadopoulos’ present address: Oscar Mayer Foods Corp., Madison, Wl 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. R. K. Miller.
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  • C. VANDERZANT,

    1. Authors Miller and Cross are with the Meats & Muscle Biology Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Authors Acuff and Vanderzant are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Author Papadopoulos’ present address: Oscar Mayer Foods Corp., Madison, Wl 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. R. K. Miller.
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  • H. R. CROSS

    1. Authors Miller and Cross are with the Meats & Muscle Biology Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Authors Acuff and Vanderzant are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843. Author Papadopoulos’ present address: Oscar Mayer Foods Corp., Madison, Wl 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. R. K. Miller.
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  • Technical article No. 25299 from the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. This study was funded, in part, by the Cattlemen's Beef Promotion and Research Board and was administered in cooperation with the Beef Industry Council of the National Live Stock and Meat Board.

  • The authors acknowledge Ms. Lisa Lucia for her assistance in conducting the microbial analysis. The authors also thank Mr. Terry Smith and Ms. Lori Evans for assistance in conducting chemical analyses.

ABSTRACT

Cooked, vacuum packaged beef top rounds injected with 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4% sodium lactate were stored up to 84 days at 0°C. Aerobic plate counts (APC), water activity, pH and lactic acid content were determined at 14-day intervals. Microbial distributions were characterized following 0.56 and 84 days storage. Increasing sodium lactate resulted in reduction in APC. Water activity was not affected by sodium lactate level. Decreases in pH were minimized at sodium lactate >3%. Initially, the microflora of roasts consisted primarily of Micrococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. After 84 days the microflora consisted primarily of hetero- and homofermentative Lactobacillus spp. No differences in APC, lactic acid content, pH or water activity occurred between top rounds with 3 and 4% sodium lactate. Cooked, refrigerated roast beef injected with up to 3 or 4% sodium lactate had microbial shelf-life up to 84 days.

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