Factors Affecting Catalysis of Lipid Oxidation by a Ferritin containing Extract of Beef Muscle

Authors

  • DENNIS L. SEMAN,

    1. Authors Decker and Crum are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0215. Author Seman's present address: Oscar Mayer Foods, Madison, WI 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. Decker.
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  • ERIC A. DECKER,

    1. Authors Decker and Crum are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0215. Author Seman's present address: Oscar Mayer Foods, Madison, WI 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. Decker.
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  • ANDREA D. CRUM

    1. Authors Decker and Crum are with the Food Science Section, Dept. of Animal Science, Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0215. Author Seman's present address: Oscar Mayer Foods, Madison, WI 53707. Address inquiries to Dr. Decker.
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  • Paper 90-5-24 of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station.

ABSTRACT

Ferritin was extracted from bovine diaphragm muscle to determine whether in situ ferritin concentrations could catalyze oxidation of phosphatidylcholine liposomes. Production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances by the ferritin-containing fraction increased with increasing ascorbate and cysteine (10–500 μ.M). Ascorbate stimulated more lipid oxidation than cysteine. Catalysis of lipid oxidation by ascorbate and the ferritin-containing fraction increased slightly with increasing pH from 5.0 to 7.0. Ferritin/ascorbate was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, EDTA and ceruloplasmin and stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Data suggest ferritin may be partially responsible for catalysis of lipid oxidation in muscle foods.

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