Volatile Compounds in Scrambled Eggs

Authors

  • JOSÉ E. MATIELLA,

    1. Authors Matiella and Hsieh were with the Dept. of Food Science, Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803. Dr. Matiella's current address: R&D, Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., 1600 W. Hill St., Louisville, KY 40210. Dr. Hsieh's present address: Analytical R&D, Ross Laboratories, 625 Cleveland Ave., Columbus, OH 43215. Direct inquiries to Dr. Hsieh.
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  • THOMAS C.-Y. HSIEH

    1. Authors Matiella and Hsieh were with the Dept. of Food Science, Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803. Dr. Matiella's current address: R&D, Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., 1600 W. Hill St., Louisville, KY 40210. Dr. Hsieh's present address: Analytical R&D, Ross Laboratories, 625 Cleveland Ave., Columbus, OH 43215. Direct inquiries to Dr. Hsieh.
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  • Supported, in part, by a grant from USDA Agricultural Research Service, Southern Regional Research Center. Approved for publication by the director of the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station as manuscript No. 90-21-4049.

ABSTRACT

Volatile compounds in scrambled eggs were analyzed by dynamic headspace sampling, high resolution gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Thirty-eight compounds were identified including aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, furans, esters, benzene derivatives, alkancs, sulfur-containing compounds and a terpene. Selected compounds were quantified. Aldehydes were the most abundant volatile compounds in the egg samples. Volatile styrene monomer increased in scrambled egg samples during 2 wk storage of shell eggs in polystyrene containers. Scrambled eggs prepared from supermarket shell eggs contained 7 times more ethylbenzene and styrene than those prepared from fresh farm eggs stored in polystyrene containers for 2 wk.

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