Changes of Selected Physical and Chemical Components in the Development of the Hard-to-Cook Bean Defect

Authors

  • D. L HENTGES,

    1. Author Hentges is with the Division of Foods & Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois, 386 Bevier Hall, Urbana, IL 61801. Author Weaver is with the Dept. of Food & Nutrition and Author Nielsen is with the Food Science Dept., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907.
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  • C. M. WEAVER,

    1. Author Hentges is with the Division of Foods & Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois, 386 Bevier Hall, Urbana, IL 61801. Author Weaver is with the Dept. of Food & Nutrition and Author Nielsen is with the Food Science Dept., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907.
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  • S. S. NIELSEN

    1. Author Hentges is with the Division of Foods & Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois, 386 Bevier Hall, Urbana, IL 61801. Author Weaver is with the Dept. of Food & Nutrition and Author Nielsen is with the Food Science Dept., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907.
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  • Presented in part at the 49th Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, Chicago, June 1989.

ABSTRACT

The effects of storage temperature and humidity were monitored on several physical and chemical components of cowpeas and beans. Seeds stored at 29°C, 65% RH required prolonged cooking times; however, seeds stored in other conditions (5°C, 30% RH; 29°C 30% RH; and 5°C, 65% RH) maintained short, stable cooking times throughout storage. As cooking time increased, phytate, phytase activity, amylose solubility, high methoxyl pectin and protein solubility decreased. Solids leached during soaking and low methoxyl pectin increased as cooking time increased. These results were consistent with the proposed theory that the hard-to-cook defect involves interactions between phytate, minerals, and pectin. However, they did not eliminate possible roles of starch and protein solubility.

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