Phytic Acid as a Food Antioxidant

Authors

  • KATHERINE L. EMPSON,

    1. Authors Empson and Labuza are with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108. Author Gratis with The Pillsbury Company Technology Center, 311 Second St. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55414. Address inquiries to Dr. Graf.
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  • THEODORE P. LABUZA,

    1. Authors Empson and Labuza are with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108. Author Gratis with The Pillsbury Company Technology Center, 311 Second St. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55414. Address inquiries to Dr. Graf.
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  • ERNST GRAF

    1. Authors Empson and Labuza are with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108. Author Gratis with The Pillsbury Company Technology Center, 311 Second St. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55414. Address inquiries to Dr. Graf.
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  • Published as paper No 18,160 of the contribution series, Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station based on research conducted under Project 18–078, supported by Hatch funds and by a grant from The Pillsbury Company.

  • Submitted (KLE) in partial fulfillment of the requirement of the University of Minnesota Graduate School for a Master's Degree in Food Science, April 20, 1990.

ABSTRACT

Phytic acid has been shown previously to form an iron chelate that inhibits iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation and lipid peroxidation. To further characterize its antioxidant properties in model food systems, we investigated the effects of phytic acid on ascorbic acid degradation in aqueous solution and on stability of oil-in-water emulsions. In both systems 1 mM phytic acid provided significant protection against oxidative damage and increased emulsion shelf-life fourfold. To test antioxidant efficacy of phytic acid in a whole food system, its effect on development of warmed-over flavor was determined. Phytic acid substantially inhibited oxygen uptake, malondialdehyde formation and warmed-over flavor development in refrigerated chicken.

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