Thiamin, Riboflavin and Niacin Retention in Cooked Cowpeas as Affected by Kanwa Treatment

Authors

  • S.G. UZOGARA,

    1. Authors Morton and Daniel are with the Dept. of Food & Nutritional Sciences, King's College, London, KQC, Kensington Campus, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH, United Kingdom. Author Uzogara's present address: Dept. of Biochemistry, Univ. of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria.
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  • I.D. MORTON,

    1. Authors Morton and Daniel are with the Dept. of Food & Nutritional Sciences, King's College, London, KQC, Kensington Campus, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH, United Kingdom. Author Uzogara's present address: Dept. of Biochemistry, Univ. of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria.
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  • J.W. DANIEL

    1. Authors Morton and Daniel are with the Dept. of Food & Nutritional Sciences, King's College, London, KQC, Kensington Campus, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH, United Kingdom. Author Uzogara's present address: Dept. of Biochemistry, Univ. of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria.
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ABSTRACT

Retention of three water soluble B-vitamins in dry cowpeas cooked with a local tenderizer, named “kanwa,” were investigated. Results showed cooking (100°C) in kanwa or sodium bicarbonate decreased levels and retention of vitamins compared to controls cooked in water. Levels of vitamins in kanwa-cooked cowpeas were not significantly different from those in NaHCO3 cooked samples. Retention in the alkaline cooking processes ranged 15–20% (thiamin), 26–49% (niacin) & 53–64% (riboflavin). Soaking followed by boiling at 100°C or pressure cooking (121°C) increased levels and retention of vitamins.

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