Chemical Physical and Sensory Stabilities of Prebaked Frozen Sweet Potatoes

Authors

  • J.Q. WU,

    1. Authors Wu, Schwartz, and Carroll are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Box 7624, Raleigh, NC 27695-7624.
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  • S.J. SCHWARTZ,

    1. Authors Wu, Schwartz, and Carroll are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Box 7624, Raleigh, NC 27695-7624.
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  • D.E. CARROLL

    1. Authors Wu, Schwartz, and Carroll are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Box 7624, Raleigh, NC 27695-7624.
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  • Paper No. 11960 of the Journal series of the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service, Raleigh, NC 27695-7643.

  • The use of trade names in this publication does not imply endorsement by the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service, nor criticism of similar ones not mentioned.

ABSTRACT

Cured, uncured and stored (1 and 3 months) sweet potato roots were baked, frozen and stored at −23°C. Sensory scores, color (CIE L,a,b values), instrumental texture profile (Instron), sugars, beta-carotene, vitamin C, alcohol insoluble solids (AIS) and moisture contents were determined after 0,1, 3, 6 and 9 months frozen storage. Baked frozen sweet potatoes from all treatments were stable during 6 months frozen storage, with exception of vitamin C, which decreased by about 50% during the first month. Surface response analysis showed sensory scores for the prebaked sweet potatoes were very acceptable, particularly in the region with 1–2 months fresh storage of roots prior to freezing and followed by 1–6 months frozen storage.

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