Factors Influencing Whey Protein Gel Rheology: Dialysis and Calcium Chelation

Authors

  • PATRICIA R. KUHN,

    1. Authors Kuhn and Foegeding are with the Southeast Dairy Foods Research Center, North Carolina State Univ., Dept. of Food Science. Box 7624, Raleigh, N. Carolina 27695-7624.
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  • E. ALLEN FOEGEDING

    1. Authors Kuhn and Foegeding are with the Southeast Dairy Foods Research Center, North Carolina State Univ., Dept. of Food Science. Box 7624, Raleigh, N. Carolina 27695-7624.
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  • Paper No. FS90-15 of the Journal Series of the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service, Raleigh, NC 27695–7643.

  • We thank Sharon R. Bottcher for much-appreciated assistance with statistical analysis. This work was supported by Southeast Dairy Foods Research Center. The WPC and WPI samples were supplied by New Zealand Milk Products Inc. and Le Sueur Isolates.

  • The use of trade names does not imply endorsement by the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service of products named, nor criticisms of similar ones not mentioned.

ABSTRACT

Influence of dialyzable compounds on the Theological properties (shear stress and shear strain at failure) of heat-induced whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI) gels was examined. Dialyzing WPC and WPI suspensions prior to gelation increased the stress of two of three WPC gels and a WPI gel. Dialysis also significantly increased the strain of the same two WPC gels, normalizing all strain values. Replacement of calcium lost through dialysis did not significantly change gel rheology. However, chelating calcium caused a significant decrease in the stress of all gels: a minimum amount of calcium and/or a calcium complex appears to have a major role in whey protein gelation.

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