Determination of Iron-Binding Phenolic Groups in Foods

Authors

  • MATS BRUNE,

    1. Authors Brune, Hallberg, and Skånberg are with the Univ. of Göteborg, Dept. of Medicine II, Sahlgenska sjukhuset, S-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
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  • LEIF HALLBERG,

    1. Authors Brune, Hallberg, and Skånberg are with the Univ. of Göteborg, Dept. of Medicine II, Sahlgenska sjukhuset, S-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
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  • ANN-BRITT SKÅNBERG

    1. Authors Brune, Hallberg, and Skånberg are with the Univ. of Göteborg, Dept. of Medicine II, Sahlgenska sjukhuset, S-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
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  • This project was supported by Swedish Medical Council Project B88-19X-04721-13B, the Swedish Council for Forestry and Agricultural Research 864/86 L 31:2, the Swedish Agency for Research Co-operation with Developing Countries 9.49/SAREC 85/42:2, and “Förenade Liv” Mutual Group Life Insurance Company, Stockholm, Sweden. We also acknowledge the help of Dr. Ulf Svanberg with the vanillin assay.

ABSTRACT

A spectrophotometric assay was developed with the specific aim of determining the content in foods of iron-binding phenolic compounds. Foods were extracted with dimethylformamide (50%) and an ironcontaining reagent was added. The resulting color was due to formation of Fe-galloyl and Fe-catechol complexes. These complexes had different absorbance maxima and could thus be separately determined by readings at two wavelengths. The method was simple and had good precision, accuracy and analytical recovery. The new method was compared with two commonly used methods for determination of phenolic content in cereals, fruits, vegetables, spices and beverages.

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