Quality Changes of Pond-raised Hybrid Striped Bass during Chillpack and Refrigerated Storage

Authors

  • L.C. BOYD,

    1. Authors Boyd and LePors are with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Box 7624, Raleigh, NC 27695-7624. Author Green is associated with the Sea Grant Seafood Extension Laboratory, Box 1137, Morehead City, NC 28557.
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  • D.P. GREEN,

    1. Authors Boyd and LePors are with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Box 7624, Raleigh, NC 27695-7624. Author Green is associated with the Sea Grant Seafood Extension Laboratory, Box 1137, Morehead City, NC 28557.
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  • L.A. LePORS

    1. Authors Boyd and LePors are with the Dept. of Food Science, North Carolina State Univ., Box 7624, Raleigh, NC 27695-7624. Author Green is associated with the Sea Grant Seafood Extension Laboratory, Box 1137, Morehead City, NC 28557.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Paper number FS90-25 of the journal series of the Dept. of Food science, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7624. This research was funded (in part) by the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service.

  • Use of trade names does not imply endorsement by the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service, nor criticism of similar ones not mentioned.

  • We also acknowledge assistance of the Sea Grant Seafood Extension Program for donation of fish and assistance; the managers of Carolina Pride, Inc. for use of their facilities in processing the fish; and special thanks to Mrs. Michele Keziah for assistance in sensory evaluations.

ABSTRACT

Pond-raised hybrid striped bass were commercially processed into fillets with and without belly flap, packaged in oxygen permeable bags (Cryovac E(tm)), and stored as chillpack samples (-2°C) and as refrigerated samples (2°C). Quality changes were determined over 21 days storage by microbiological, chemical, and sensory evaluations. Aerobic plate counts and hypoxanthine formation showed evidence of rapid deterioration of refrigerated samples after 8 days storage compared to 21 days for chillpack samples. A trained sensory panel found 21 day stored chillpack samples similar in flavor and aroma but of firmer texture than refrigerated samples stored 8 days. Panelists found no differences between trimmed and whole fillets. Hypoxanthine formation and aerobic plate counts appeared to be good indicators of quality deterioration, whereas thiobarbituric acid measurements were not.

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