Bacteriological Profile and Shelflife of White Amur (Ctenopharyngodon idella)

Authors

  • J.W. WEMPE,

    1. Both authors were formerly affiliated with the Dept. of Food Technology & Science, Univ. of Tennessee, P.O. Box 1071, Knoxville, TN 37901. Author Wempe's present address: Lancaster Laboratories, 2425 New Holland Pike, Lancaster, PA 17601. Author Davidson's present address: Dept. of Food Science & Toxicology, Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83843.
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  • P.M. DAVIDSON

    1. Both authors were formerly affiliated with the Dept. of Food Technology & Science, Univ. of Tennessee, P.O. Box 1071, Knoxville, TN 37901. Author Wempe's present address: Lancaster Laboratories, 2425 New Holland Pike, Lancaster, PA 17601. Author Davidson's present address: Dept. of Food Science & Toxicology, Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83843.
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  • We express gratitude to Dr. J. Larry Wilson, Dept. of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries. Univ. of Tennessee. Knoxville for assistance in this project.

ABSTRACT

Our objective was to compile a bacteriological profile and determine the effect of several storage conditions on the shelflife of white amur (Ctenopharyngodon idella). The profile showed the presence of Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Micrococcus, Moraxella, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus. Storage studies on white amur flesh indicated 4°C and 200 μg/mL sodium hypochlorite dip were most effective against coliforms. Packaging in 100% CO2 significantly reduced aerobic bacterial growth (APC) compared to air. Freezing the flesh for 8 wk at - 18°C reduced viable APC, psychrotrophs, and coliforms. Shelflife of white amur should be increased using storage conditions evaluated.

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