Recovery of Grapefruit Oil Constituents from Processing Waste Water using Styrene-divinylbenzene Resins

Authors

  • A. P. ERICSON,

    1. The authors are with the Food Science & Human Nutrition Dept, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Address correspondence to Dr. R. F. Matthews.
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  • R. F. MATTHEWS,

    1. The authors are with the Food Science & Human Nutrition Dept, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Address correspondence to Dr. R. F. Matthews.
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  • A. A. TEIXEIRA,

    1. The authors are with the Food Science & Human Nutrition Dept, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Address correspondence to Dr. R. F. Matthews.
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  • H. A MOYE

    1. The authors are with the Food Science & Human Nutrition Dept, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Address correspondence to Dr. R. F. Matthews.
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  • Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Series No. R-01382.

  • Gratitude is extended to Golden Gem Gmwers, Inc., Silver Springa Citrus Coop., Indian River Foods, Inc., and Citrus World, Inc. for donation of samples.

ABSTRACT

Styrene-divinylbenzene (SDVB) resins were utilized for the recovery of coldpressed grapefruit oil constituents from model solutions and waste waters. Sorption rates and sorption capacities were determined for a series of resins with model solutions. Citrus oil processing waste water was passed through an upflow column extraction system. Adsorbed oil was desorbed using 95% ethanol and gas chromatographic analysis was performed to determine the quality of the extracted oil. The waste water samples contained suspended solids which reduced the extraction ability of the resins. Major compounds recovered from waste waters were d-limonene and alpha-terpineol. Nootkatone and linalool recovery levels varied, while octanal and decanal were present in extremely low levels in the recovered products.

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